Monday, March 30, 2009

Galley Grab!

So it's a pretty old post of theirs, but just last week I was directed to this Gawker article about using galleys to get, um, well, to get to know someone better (I think someone tweeted about it--thank you, whomever you are!).

I can categorically state that I have never been hit on due to my reading of a galley (or of any book, actually. Another chapter in the story of my sad solitary existence. Sorry, that was way too much self-pitying). I have caused confusion and anger when someone once noticed I had a paperback copy of a book that was only available in hardcover. They first thought I was lying to them when I said it was only available in hardcover and then thought I was being snobby and showing off when really I wasn't, I was just trying to explain why I had a paperback. I felt horrible (I'll now move from self-pitying to self-loathing). And this is why I now try to hide my galleys when I read them in public (especially if I'm behind in my reading and the book has already been released), thereby making sure I'll never succeed in flirtation via advanced access. Oh, the humanity!

But, gentle readers, do not let my failures of seduction deter you from testing this out yourselves! Herewith I offer some galleys that may spark interest or conversation with that attractive somebody squashed next to you on the Green Line.

Stone's Fall by Iain Pears--A new historical mystery from the author of An Instance of the Fingerpost, this is a mystery of high finance and espionage set in fin-de-siecle Europe (read more here). **Added flirtation bonus--this puppy is 800 pages which makes you appear erudite, shows your ability to commit (if only to an intense read) and allows you to show off those triceps!**

The City and the City by China Mieville--A sci-fi mystery that involves places named Beszel and Ul Qoma and an investigation into murder by Inspector Tyador Borlu of the Extreme Crime Squad (read more here). **This will totally get you in with that geek chic guy you've been eyeing.**

The Food of a Younger Land edited by Mark Kurlansky--I am so super-psyched for this one! Kurlansky is one of the kings of literary nonfiction with his popular food histories such as Salt and Cod. Here he has compiled writings from a previously unpublished WPA project titled "America Eats" which employed authors--including Zora Neale Hurston and Eudora Welty--to record the regional eating habits and histories of regular Americans (read more here). **You can take your flirtation to the next level by inviting that cutie checking out your book to join you for our reading with Mr. Kurlansky on Friday, May 15th at 7:00.**

If you want in on these opportunities for connection, even if just with a good book, please leave me a note in the comments with your name and I'll leave the book for you at our front counter. Unfortunately I only have one copy of each so it'll be first come, first served. And please, allow me to share the love by only requesting one title.

8 comments:

Marie said...

I would love the Mieville book! thanks!

KarraCrow said...

i'll take the china mieville! pretty please?

Bookseller Bill said...

I'd love the Mieville galley if it's still available. Thanks!

Bill Johnston

Raquelle said...

Oh I love reading galleys out in public and I try to flaunt them as much as possible, but haven't had anyone yet approach me about it. Probably because I'm only reading Candlewick galleys. :-(

Pam said...

Ooo, as an archivist with a passion for food, The Food of a Younger Land sounds fascinating! I'd love to give it a read!

Jonelle said...

If no one's grabbed it yet, I'd love The Food of a Younger Land. I'm kind of obsessed with WPA stuff...

sallybranwyn said...

Ooh, can I ask for The Food of a Younger Land?

My name is Sally.

JBD said...

Iain Pears is an old favorite, I'd love the "Stone's Fall" if it's still available.

- Jeremy Dibbell